• Jue. Dic 1st, 2022

Biblioteca Osint

Si lo que quieres es tener una verdadera Biblioteca Osint ahĂ­ va una recopilaciĂłn importante

  • Akhgar, B., Bayerl, P. & F. Sampson (eds.) (2016) Open Source Intelligence Investigation: From Strategy to Implementation. Springer.
  • Akın Ünver, H. (2018) Digital Open Source Intelligence and International Security: A Primer. Centre for Economics and Foreign Policy Studies.
  • Mercado, S. (2001) ‘OSINT from the Airwaves: FBIS Against the Axis, 1941-1945’, Studies in Intelligence, Vol 11: pp 33-43.
  • Mercado, S. (2004) ‘Sailing the Sea of OSINT in the Information Age‘, Studies in Intelligence, Vol. 48(3): pp. 45-55.
  • Miller, B. (2018). ‘Open source intelligence (OSINT): An oxymoron?’, International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence, Vol. 31(4), pp. 702-719.
  • Minas, H. (2010) Can the Open Source Intelligence emerge as an indispensable discipline for the Intelligence Community in the 21st Century? RIEAS Research Paper 139.
  • Monaghan, R. (2019) ‘Loyalist supergrass trials: an opportunity for open source intelligence?’, Intelligence and National Security, Vol. 34(7): pp. 1014-1026.
  • Murray, D., Y. McDermott and K. Alexa Koenig (2022) ‘Mapping the Use of Open Source Research in UN Human Rights Investigations‘, in Journal of Human Rights Practices, 2022, 1-28.
  • Nance, M. (1994) The Generation Gap: Open-Source Information, Intelligence, and the Government. National War College.
  • NATO (2002) Open Source Intelligence Handbook.
  • NATO (2002) Open Source Intelligence Reader.
  • NATO (2002) Intelligence Exploitation of the Internet.
  • NATO (2018) ‘Communicating Uncertainty, Assessing Information Quality and Risk, and Using Structured Techniques in Intelligence Analysis’, proceedings of the SAS-114 Workshop held from 5-7 December 2016 in Copenhagen, Denmark.
  • Noble, D.F. (2004) Assessing the Reliability of Open Source Information. Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Information Fusion.
  • NoĂ«l, R. (2014) Contribution Ă  la veille stratĂ©gique : DOWSER, un systĂšme de dĂ©couverte de sources Web d’intĂ©rĂȘt opĂ©rationnel. ThĂšse de doctorat. Institut National des Sciences AppliquĂ©es de Rouen.
  • Norman, D. (2001) How to Identify Credible Sources on the web. Thesis, Faculty of the Joint Military Intelligence College.
  • Ogar, S. (2019) Covert Networks – A comparative study of Intelligence Techniques used by Foreign Intelligence Agencies to Weaponize Social Media. MA Thesis Johns Hopskins University, USA.
  • Olcott, A. (2012) Open Source Intelligente in a Networked World.
  • Omand, D. (2012) ‘Introducing Social Media Intelligence (SOCMINT)’, Intelligence and National Security Vol. 27(6): pp. 801–823.
  • Omand, D. (2020) How Spies Think: Ten Lessons in Intelligence.
  • Pallaris, C. (2008) Open Source Intelligence: A Strategic Enabler of National Security. CSS Analyses in Security, Vol.3, No. 32. ETH, Zurich.
  • Pastor-Galindo, J., P. Nespoli, F. Gomez Marmo, and G. Martinez Perez (2020) ‘The Not Yet Exploited Goldmine of OSINT: Opportunities, Open Challenges and Future Trends‘, IEEE Access, Vol. 8: pp. 10282-10304.
  • Pedersen, T. and P. Jansen (2019) ‘Seduced by secrecy – perplexed by complexity: effects of secret vs open-source on intelligence credibility and analytic confidence’, Intelligence and National Security, Vol. 34(6): pp. 881-898
  • Perito, D., C. Castelluccia, M. Kaafar and P. Manils (2011) How Unique and Traceable are Usernames? Conference paper ArXiv.
  • Pherson R. and R. Heuer (2020) Structured Analytic Techniques. Sage, London.
  • Politi, A. (2000) The birth of OSINT in Italy. International conference OSS 21, Information-Sharing Scenarios Panel, Washington DC.
  • Pouchard, L., J. Dobson and J. Trien (2007) A Framework for the Systematic Collection of Open Source Intelligence. Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
  • Pringle, Robert W. (2003) ‘The Limits of OSINT: Diagnosing the Soviet Media, 1985-1989’, International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence, Vol. 16(2): pp. 280-289.
  • Pythian M., (Ed.) (2013) Understanding the Intelligence Cycle. London: Routledge.
  • Quick, D. and K. Choo (2018) ‘Digital forensic intelligence: Data subsets and Open Source Intelligence (DFINT+OSINT): A timely and cohesive mix’, Future Generation Computer Systems, Vol. 78(2): pp. 558-567.
  • Rasak, M.J. (2021) ‘Event Barraging and the Death of Tactical Level Open-Source Intelligence’, in Military review, Vol.101 (1), p.48-57.
  • Reuser, A.H.P. (2017) ‘The RIS Open Source Intelligence Cycle’, Journal of Mediterranean and Balkan Intelligence, Vol. 10(2): pp. 29-44.
  • Roop, J. (1969) Foreign Broadcast Information Service. History, Part I: 1941-1947. CIA.
  • Saunders, K. (2000) Open source information: A true collection discipline. Thesis, Royal Military College of Canada.
  • Schaurer, F. And J. Storger (2010) The Evolution of Open Source Intelligence. International Relations and Security Networks, Zurich.
  • Senekal, B. and E. KotzĂ© (2019) ‘Open source intelligence (OSINT) for conflict monitoring in contemporary South Africa: Challenges and opportunities in a big data context’, African Security Review, 28:1, 19-37.
  • Sibbet, D. (1993) ‘Commercial Remote -Sensing: Open Source Imagery Intelligence’, in American Intelligence Journal, Spring/Summer 1993, pp. 37-40.
  • Shamaeva, I. and Galley, D.M. (2021) Custom Search – Discover more:: A Complete Guide to Google Programmable Search Engines. Taylor & Francis Ltd.
  • Sigurdson J. and P. Nelson (1991) ‘Intelligence Gathering and Japan: The Elusive Role of Grey Intelligence’, International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence, Vol. 5(1): pp. 17-34.

Legal y Ético

  • Angus-Anderson, W. (2015) ‘Authenticity and Admissibility of Social Media Website Printouts’, in Duke Law & Technology Review, Vol 14, pp 33-47.
  • Commissie van Toezicht op de Inlichtingen en Veiligheidsdiensten (2022) Automated OSINT: Tools en bronnen voor openbronnenonderzoek. CTIVD rapport 74.
  • Cuijpers, C. (2013) ‘Legal aspects of open source intelligence’, The computer law and security report, Vol.29 (6), p.642-653.
  • Department of Justice Cybersecurity Unit (2020) Legal Considerations when Gathering Online Cyber Threat Intelligence and Purchasing Data from Illicit Sources. Washington, Computer Crime & Intellectual Property Section Criminal Division U.S. Department of Justice.
  • Dubberley, S., A. Koenig and D. Murray (eds) (2019) Digital Witness: Using Open Source Information for Human Rights Investigation, Documentation, and Accountability. Oxford Public International Law.
  • Gradecki, J. and D. Curry (2017) ‘Crowd-Sourced Intelligence Agency: Prototyping countersurveillance’, in Big Data & Society, January-June 2017, pp. 1-7.
  • Hamilton, R. (2018). User-Generated Evidence. The Columbia Journal of Transnational Law 57(1), pp. 1-61.
  • Hiatt, K. (2016). Open Source Evidence on Trial. The Yale Law Journal Forum.
  • Hulsen, L. Ten (2020) ‘Open Source evidence from the internet – the protection of privacy in civilian criminal investigations using OSINT’, Amsterdam Law Forum, vol. 12 (2).
  • Kidd, J. (2019) ‘Secret and ethically sensitive research’, The Routledge International Handbook of Universities, Security and Intelligence Studies, pp. 265-271. London: Routledge.
  • RĂžnn, K. and S. SĂže (2019) ‘Is social media intelligence private? Privacy in public and the nature of social media intelligence’, Intelligence and National security, Vol 34(3), p. 362-378.
  • Sampson, F (2017) ‘Intelligent evidence: Using open source intelligence (OSINT) in criminal proceedings’, in The Police Journal: Theory, Practice and Principles, Voil 90(1), pp. 55-69.
  • Saugmann, R.(2019) ‘The civilian’s visual security paradox: how open source intelligence practices create insecurity for civilians in warzones’, Intelligence and National Security, 34:3, 344-361.
  • United Nations (2020) Berkeley Protocol on Digital Open Source Investigations. A Practical Guide on the Effective Use of Digital Open Source Information in Investigating Violations of International Criminal, Human Rights and Humanitarian Law.
  • Sibbet, D. (1993) ‘Commercial Remote -Sensing: Open Source Imagery Intelligence’, in American Intelligence Journal, Spring/Summer 1993, pp. 37-40.
  • Sigurdson J. and P. Nelson (1991) ‘Intelligence Gathering and Japan: The Elusive Role of Grey Intelligence’, International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence, Vol. 5(1): pp. 17-34.
  • Steele, R. (1993) ‘National Intelligence and Open Source: From School House to White House‘, American Intelligence Journal, Spring/Summer 1993, pp. 29-33.
  • Steele, R. (1995) ‘Private enterprise intelligence: Its potential contribution to national security”, Intelligence and National Security, Vol. 10(4): 212-228.
  • Steele, R. (2004) Special Operations Forces Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) Handbook. OSS International Press, Oakton.
  • Steele, R. (2009) ‘Open Source Intelligence’, in L. Johnson (ed.) Handbook of Intelligence Studies. London: Routledge.
  • Störger, J (2008) ‘Die Rolle von Open Source Intelligence im Rahmen deutscher Sicherheitsinteressen.’ Master thesis Ecole nationale d’Administration, Paris, France.
  • Stottlemyre, S. (2015) HUMINT, OSINT, or Something New? Defining Crowdsourced Intelligence’, in International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence, 28:3, pp 578-589.
  • Studeman, W. (1993) ‘Teaching the Giant to Dance: Contradictions and Opportunities in Open Source Information within the Intelligence Community‘, American Intelligence Journal, Spring/Summer 1993, pp. 11-18.
  • Townsend, R. (1993) ‘Deception and Irony: Soviet Arms and Arms Control’, in American Intelligence Journal, Spring/Summer 1993, pp. 47-53.
  • Travers, M., L. van Boven and C. Judd (2013) ‘The Secrecy Heuristic: Inferring Quality from Secrecy in Foreign Policy Contexts’, Political Psychology, Vol. 35(1): 97-111.
  • Trottier, D. (2015) ‘Open source intelligence, social media and law enforcement: Visions, constraints and critiques’, in European Journal of Cultural Studies, Vol 18 (4-5), pp. 530-547.
  • U.S. Army (2006) Open Source Intelligence. Field Manual Interim No. 2-22.9. Washington, DC.
  • U.S. Army (2012) ATP 2-22.9 Open-Source Intelligence. Headquarters, Department of the Army.
  • U.S. Army (2013) JP 2-0 Joint Intelligence. Chiefs of Staff, United States Army.
  • U.S. Department of Defence (2021) Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. Washington, DC.
  • Umphress, D. (2005) ‘Diving the Digital Dumpster: The Impact of the Internet on Collecting Open-Source Intelligence’, Air & Space Power Journal, Vol. 19 (4): pp. 82-91.
  • Wallner, P. (1993) Open Sources and the Intelligence Community: Myths and Realities’, in American Intelligence Journal, Spring/Summer 1993, pp. 19-24.
  • Waltz, E. (2003) Knowledge Management in the Intelligence Enterprise. Artech House.
  • Watson, D. (2007) ‘Stealing corporate secrets using open source intelligence (the practitioner’s view)’, International Journal of Electronic Security and Digital Forensics (IJESDF), 1(1).
  • Watson, D. (2010) ‘Open Source Intelligence’, Handbook of Electronic Security and Digital Forensics, pp. 263-277.
  • Wells, D. and H. Gibson (2017) ‘OSINT from a UK perspective: considerations from the law enforcement and military domains‘, in Proceedings Estonian Academy of Security Sciences, 16 : From Research to Security Union. Estonian Academy of Security Sciences, pp. 84-113.
  • Westcott, C. (2019) ‘Open source intelligence Academic research, journalism or spying?’, in The Routledge International Handbook of Universities, Security and Intelligence Studies, pp. 383-393. London: Routledge.
  • Wheatley, B. (2017) British Intelligence and Hitler’s Empire in the Soviet Union 1941-1945. London: Bloomsbury Academic.
  • Wheatley, B. (2018) ‘British open source intelligence (OSINT) and the Holocaust in the Soviet Union: persecution, extermination and partisan warfare’, Intelligence and National Security, Vol. 33(3): pp. 422-438.
  • Williams, H. and I. Blum (2018) Defining Second Generation Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) for the Defense Enterprise. RAND Research report.
  • Wirtz J. and J. Rosenwasser (2010) ‘From Combined Arms to Combined Intelligence: Philosophy, Doctrine and Operations’, Intelligence and National Security, Vol. 25(6): pp. 725–743.
  • Yates, A. and N. Zvegintzov (1999) ‘A Siberian reality check on open source information’, Aslib Proceedings, Vol. 51(6): pp. 175-186.
  • Ziolkowska, A. (2018) ‘Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) as an element of Military recon’, in Security and Defence Quarterly, 19(2).

TĂ©cnicos

Esta sección contiene las publicaciones mås técnicas, a menudo con una superposición en anålisis forense digital.

Aplicaciones

Esta sección contiene artículos que muestran aplicaciones de investigación de la vida real de las herramientas y técnicas OSINT.

  • Kpozehouen et al (2020) ‘Using Open-Source Intelligence to Detect Early Signals of COVID-19 in China: Descriptive Study‘, JMIR Public Health and Surveillance, Vol. 6(3). 
  • Maybir, J. and Chapman, B. (2021) ‘Web scraping of ecstasy user reports as a novel tool for detecting drug market trends’, in Forensic Science International: Digital Investigation, Vol 37.
  • Yates, A. and N. Zvegintzov (1999) ‘A Siberian reality check on open source information’, Aslib Proceedings, Vol. 51(6): pp. 175-186.